Should my teen watch that?

maxresdefault

I was working out at the gym one morning and overheard a conversation between two moms.  They were discussing the movies they went to see over the weekend. One mom mentioned taking her teen daughter and her boyfriend to the new Deadpool movie.  She then described how surprisingly awkward it felt to watch this movie with her daughter specifically because of a drawn out sex scene.  I thought to myself “I would not want to see a sex scene with my child.”

So, should I let my teen see the movie Deadpool?

I will not tell you what to do as a parent, but I can give advice and help you understand what teenagers are thinking, which is usually different each day.

Many of you have probably been asked by your teenager if they can go see this movie.  This will not be the last inappropriate movie your teenage will want to see so you need to know what is in these movies and be prepared with a response.  And I do not mean a list of scriptures that you can throw at your student every time they want to see something you don’t like.

 

Here are four tips when making decisions of movie viewing:

 

Be informed

Do not be like the gym mom who did not know what she was getting into.  Do your homework.  Google the movie and type parent review after: deadpool parent review  and you will find every bad word and bit of nudity found in the movie.  Here is the parent guide to Deadpool: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1431045/parentalguide

Talk openly with your teen

Your teen wants to be exposed to everything found in these movies.  Talk with them about what they are going to view.  Use this opportunity to ask questions like, “does it bother you to hear these words?” “What do you know about ….?” “Have you ever seen …. happen in real life?”

Help your student make the wise decision

As your students grow, they need to begin making decisions for themselves. You cannot make all of their decisions for them. Part of becoming an adult is making tough decisions, which means they will need to live with the consequences of their decision. Depending on your student’s maturity level you might be able to let them make this decision, each of you know your own child. Our students are inundated with different types of media every day, you cannot filter every single thing they see or hear. So instead of telling them what they can and cannot watch, help them learn to make wise decisions.

Take this opportunity to get closer

Find out why they want to watch what they watch or with what they like to listen. Become interested in the things they are interested in and maybe it will help you understand them better. If there are things that you think are inappropriate, talk to them about it and ask them why they’re OK with watching or listening to inappropriate things. Maybe even go to the movie with them ( they’re probably going to see it eventually anyway, especially if you have a Netflix account) and talk with them about the movie afterward.

 

Watch the youtube video I posted below to give you a clever way to talk about media:

 

 

References:

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1431045/parentalguide

https://www.washingtonpost.com/express/wp/2016/02/12/deadpool-is-not-ok-for-kids-but-it-might-be-just-what-your-teen-needs/

https://www.commonsensemedia.org/movie-reviews/deadpool/user-reviews/adult

 

12003376_10102235762960458_7453360965180052522_n

Andrew Marshall- Husband, Father of two (one on the way), Youth Pastor in Chesapeake, VA, musician, and now author. I wish to share all I have learned with the world and spark creativity wherever I can.